19 for ’19: Pamela’s Op-Ed Makes #4 Most Read for Star Tribune

Pamela Hill NettletonArticles, Star TribuneLeave a Comment

The end of the year is here, and with it comes Star Tribune’s list of most read Opinions. 19 for ’19: The most-read opinions 4. “We are asking the wrong questions about domestic violence,” by Pamela Hill Nettleton, Ph.D., who studies gender in media and teaches media studies and communication at the University of St. Thomas. When it comes to domestic violence, we ask the wrong question: “Why does she stay?” We ought to ask: “Why does he hit?” You can read the full article via the Star Tribune, and the article is also available here on this site.

We are asking the wrong questions about Domestic Violence

Pamela Hill NettletonEssays, Star TribuneLeave a Comment

Focus needs to shift from the victim to the abuser. When it comes to domestic violence, we ask the wrong question: “Why does she stay?” We ought to ask: “Why does he hit?” In media coverage of domestic violence, in social media conversations about intimate partner violence, and when we as individuals try to think through why tragedies like the Nov. 24 Schladetzky familicide in Minneapolis occur, the focus too frequently turns to what part the victim played in attracting violence. Our conversations rarely ask why men abuse women. In an attempt to be helpful, we offer information about how women can leave abusive men or where the local shelters are located. But there are no messages for men about … Read More

It’s not the flavor of odd holiday foods we crave, but the taste of home

Pamela Hill NettletonArticles, Star TribuneLeave a Comment

Foods like fruitcake, pig’s jowls and lutefisk are all but unpalatable, but we keep making them, year after year. Sometimes food is not really good at being food but we still love it. Why, for Pete’s sake? Many a culture, religion, ethnic group, and extended family has some traditional thingy on its holiday menu that takes a day-and-a-half and six people to prepare, looks odd, smells disgusting, tastes terrible, and is sensibly avoided by the most logical people at the table — the 5-year-olds. We do not require these foods for nutrition or enjoy these foods as edible stuffs, but by golly, we keep reproducing them, and forcing beloved family members to eat them. Take, for example, the brick of … Read More